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HOMECOMING 2014: SPARTANS MAKING HEADLINES

HEADLINER HEADLINES HOMECOMING

HEADLINER HEADLINES HOMECOMING

"Headliner Headlines Homecoming," say that three times fast. Whereas many may fall prey to a slip of the tongue, 2014 Homecoming Grand Marshal Jemele Hill would probably have no trouble with any tongue twister thrown her way. A native of Detroit, Hill graduated from the College of Communication Arts and Sciences with a degree in journalism and minor in Spanish in 1997.

After beginning her career writing headlines as a journalist, Hill is now making headlines as an African American female in a very visible industry dominated by males. She currently co-hosts ESPN2's Numbers Never Lie with Michael Smith. Hill joined ESPN in November 2006 as a national columnist on ESPN.com and has made regular appearances on television, including SportsCenter, ESPN First Take, Jim Rome is Burning and Outside the Lines. Before joining ESPN, Hill worked as a columnist for the Orlando Sentinel from 2005 - 2006. From 1999 - 2005, she served as a sports writer with the Detroit Free Press, covering Michigan State football and basketball. Hill began her career in 1997 as a general assignment sports writer for the Raleigh News & Observer.

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BANKS GIVE BIRTH

BANKS GIVE BIRTH

In a strange twist of fate, our university would not have been established were it not for our rival down the road. University of Michigan President Harry Tappan was intent on convincing the Michigan Legislature to act upon the state constitution, which called for an agricultural college to be established as a part of the University of Michigan, or as an autonomous institution. John C. Holmes, secretary of the Michigan State Agricultural Society, argued that young farmers would not receive the attention they needed in the already established school. Holmes' argument eventually trumped Tappan's, and on February 12, 1855, Governor Kinsley S. Bingham signed legislation establishing the Agricultural College of the State of Michigan.

On June 16, 1855, the Michigan State Agricultural Society executive committee selected a 676 57/100th acre tract for the campus, calling it "...a judicious and admirable location." Classes began on May 13, 1857, with three buildings, five faculty members and 63 male students.

As America's first agricultural college, a curriculum was difficult to construct. President John R. Williams turned to the newly established American Medical School as a model, leading to the establishment of a science-based curriculum that required more scientific study than practically any undergraduate institution of the era. Three hours of manual labor daily were also required, which kept costs down for both the students and the college.

MSU continues to celebrate Founders' Day with the president's State of the University Address and by recognizing distinguished faculty with the All-University Awards.

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150FT OF WOOD KEEPS MAC COWS DRY

150FT OF WOOD KEEPS MAC COWS DRY

Believe it or not, at one point in time it was not unusual to see cows traversing campus. In 1860, the construction of the first bridge across the Red Cedar River allowed both students and livestock to navigate campus more easily. The original bridge was constructed of wood planking and piles, was 150 feet long and 16 feet wide and cost $750. This first bridge was constructed at the present site of the Farm Lane Bridge. Michigan Agricultural College enrollment at the time was 66 students and hundreds of cows.

More than 150 years later, agriculture is at the heart of MSU. There are still hundreds of cows in the barns around campus and researchers remain committed to advancing the cattle industry. Lorraine Sordillo, Meadow Brook Chair of Farm Animal Health and Well-being in the College of Veterinary Medicine, is one such researcher. She recently received a grant of nearly $1 million to lead a multi-institutional, multidisciplinary effort to adapt mobile technology to help farmers prevent dairy cattle illness. The team hopes to develop a mobile app that will allow farmers to input a series of variables to calculate the risk of metabolic stress on pregnant cows and those that have recently delivered. By reducing the stress, cows will be able to reach their full milk-producing capacity. To learn more about this project, visit homecoming.msu.edu/cows.

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MAC GRADUATES SERVE PROUDLY

MAC GRADUATES SERVE PROUDLY

Michigan State students have a long and proud tradition of serving their country, beginning in 1861 with the onset of the Civil War when the entire graduating class enlisted. These brave souls from the college's first graduating class included:

  • A.F. Allen, who subsequently became a farmer
  • A. Bayley, who subsequently became a farmer
  • L.V. Beebe, who subsequently became an insurance agent
  • H.D. Benham, who passed away while enlisted in the Army
  • G.A. Dickey, who bravely fought in the Battle of Gettysburg
  • C.E. Hollister, who subsequently became a farmer
  • A.N. Prentiss, who subsequently became a botany professor at Cornell University and would later join the MAC faculty

The Alumni Memorial Chapel celebrates the supreme sacrifice made by Spartans who have served their country and died in wartime. Located just north of the Red Cedar River on Auditorium Road next to the Kresge Art Center, the chapel is loved by many but is perhaps one of campus' least known treasures. Thousands of Spartans have been married at the chapel since it was first built "in honor of those who served their country, and in memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice," as it proclaims in Gothic carvings above its entrance. Even today, it handles some 160 nuptials a year, often three on Saturdays.

To learn more about the Alumni Memorial Chapel, visit homecoming.msu.edu/chapel.

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MAC AT ODDS WITH PAUL BUNYAN

MAC AT ODDS WITH PAUL BUNYAN

Imagine a morning commute along I-96 without the wonderful forest scenery. This may have been a real - and awful - possibility were it not for the efforts of MAC. As early as the 1870s, the faculty of the college recognized the ominous threat of Michigan deforestation. During this time, Chemistry Professor Robert Kedzie and Botany and Forestry Professor William Beal wrote at length protesting the rapid disappearance of Michigan's forests and encouraging farmers to plant trees. In 1877, a forest nursery was established on campus to provide farmers with saplings at a nominal cost. By 1933, MAC's tree nurseries produced 1.3 million saplings for the U.S. Forest Service and Civilian Conservation Corps with the goal of replacing "a tree for a tree" to preserve and sustain Michigan's woodlands.

MSU remains at the forefront of initiatives to maintain the health of forests to address concerns related to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently released a report that provides uniform scientific methods for quantifying the changes in greenhouse gas emissions and carbon storage from various land management and conservation activities. Three MSU researchers contributed to the report, including Phil Robertson, director of MSU's Kellogg Biological Station's Long-term Ecological Research Program and professor of plant, soil and microbial sciences; Wendy Powers-Schilling, professor of animal science; and David Skole, professor of forestry. To learn more about the report, visit homecoming.msu.edu/forest.

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AN EVERGREEN LEGACY IS PLANTED

AN EVERGREEN LEGACY IS PLANTED

Would our identity as Spartans still hold true if it were not tied to the color green? It's hard to imagine cheering any other words besides "Go Green, Go White." Luckily, you need not ponder the possibilities as the color that brings so much pride to all of Spartan Nation can be traced back to 1887 when students and fans of MAC wore green ribbons at a field event.

One hundred and twenty-seven years after MAC first became affiliated with the color, Spartans are green in more ways than one. MSU's commitment to sustaining the environment can be seen in the creation of a sustainability specialization and the Residential Initiative onthe Study of the Environment (RISE) program, our research into and use of alternative energy on campus, the campus-wide recycling program and purchase of local and sustainable foods.

MSU has received recognition for our efforts in sustainability from multiple sources. The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education recently awarded MSU a silver rating from the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS), a new program that measures and encourages sustainability in all aspects of higher education. MSU was one of 26 schools awarded silver status.

For more information on MSU's sustainability initiatives, visit bespartangreen.msu.edu.

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MAC'S FIRST HEROINES

MAC'S FIRST HEROINES

What do Susan Packard, Jemele Hill and Carole Leigh Hutton all have in common? They're among Michigan State's list of highly accomplished graduates and they all just happen to be women. Were it not for an 1895 curriculum change and progressive thinking, they may have become the successes that they are at a different university.

MAC was struggling at the time - enrollment was low, the college had a less than savory reputation, thanks in part to the rowdy behavior of male students, and faculty were leaving MAC for other newly established land-grant institutions. The Board of Agriculture appointed a committee to examine the institution and report on what was needed to rectify the situation. One of seven recommendations was the creation of a women's course. The idea stuck and Old Abbot Hall was remodeled to include a dining room and cooking laboratory. Lodging rooms were ready by 1896, and with 42 women enrolling, the program was an instant success.

Today, more than half of MSU's student body is female. Many resources are devoted to helping women succeed at MSU and in their lives afterward, including the Women's Resource Center. Serving as the first point of contact for women's issues and information at the university, the center serves approximately 33,000 women annually on campus. In addition, the center provides vital information and resources to numerous MSU departments, offices and academic disciplines.

For more information on the Women's Resource Center, visit wrc.msu.edu.

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PIONEER CONGRATULATED BY ROUGH RIDER

PIONEER CONGRATULATED BY ROUGH RIDER

Pioneers are determined to reach their goals despite the odds against them. Myrtle Craig Mowbray, class of 1907, was a true pioneer, becoming the first black female graduate of MAC. She was one of only four black students on campus and the only female of the four. Mowbray received her diploma from President Theodore Roosevelt who was the 1907 commencement speaker.

Myrtle Craig Mowbray and other MSU pioneers in the area of civil rights are being celebrated this year through Project 60/50, which marks the 60th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision in Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act being signed into law. To learn more about Project 60/50, visit msu.edu/6050.

Even today, the Mowbray name continues to impact MSU students. The Myrtle Craig Mowbray Scholars Program, open by application to all students, includes in its mission the support of students of color in the Honors College who have demonstrated potential for leadership in promoting cross-cultural understanding. Mowbray Scholars receive $7,500 to use over two semesters (usually during the summers) preceding graduation for research and international engagement experiences. For the 2014-2015 academic year, these funds are a portion of the nearly $1.2 billion in financial aid awarded to more than 44,000 MSU students. For more information on financing an MSU education, visit finaid.msu.edu.

Increasing donor support to help a greater number of students attend MSU remains a top priority for the institution. To explore ways that you can make a difference to current and future MSU students, visit givingto.msu.edu.

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OUT STANDING IN THEIR FIELDS

OUT STANDING IN THEIR FIELDS

From early in its history, Michigan State University has been committed to applying the knowledge developed through its research to everyday problems. One of the first ways this commitment was turned into action was through the development of the Extension program, which hired its first livestock agent in 1907. Like many parts of our history, this action blazed a trail and five years later the Michigan Legislature authorized county boards of supervisors to appropriate funds and levy taxes to further teaching and demonstrations in Extension work. Eleven agricultural agents were named that year. In 1914, Congress passed the Smith-Lever Act, which created the Cooperative Extension System and directed the nation's land grant universities to oversee its work.

With the passage of the Smith-Lever Act, the first statewide home economics and 4-H youth Extension workers were appointed; county home economics agents were appointed beginning in 1915. In the early years of Extension, "demonstration agents" showed or demonstrated new farming or homemaking techniques.

Today, Michigan State University maintains a presence in each of Michigan's 83 counties and helps people improve their lives by bringing the vast resources of the university directly to individuals, communities and businesses. To learn more about MSU Extension, visit msue.anr.msu.edu.

The Extension program is just one of the many ways that the university is helping to make Michigan stronger. To see the impact that MSU is having throughout the state, visit mispartanimpact.msu.edu.

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SWEET SEASON, SWEETER VICTORY OVER SOUR FOE

SWEET SEASON, SWEETER VICTORY OVER SOUR FOE

Our strong football tradition extends as far back as 1896, when football first gained varsity status on MAC's campus. Within 17 years the "Aggies" became a solid team and surprised many when they went 7-0 to have a perfect season in 1913. The season was topped off with a cherry as victory came over the University of Michigan, 12-7.

Since the football program began, Michigan State has won or shared a total of six National Championships (1951, 1952, 1955, 1957, 1965 and 1966), two Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association Championships (1903 and 1905) and eight Big Ten Championships (1953, 1965, 1966, 1978, 1987, 1990, 2010 and 2013). The Spartans also boast an 80 percent win percentage in the Rose Bowl Game, with victories in 1954, 1956, 1988 and 2014, and one loss in 1966.

The 2014 Spartan Football Team is enjoying the benefit of the recently completed North End Zone expansion to Spartan Stadium, which includes an all-sports recruitment facility on the concourse level, a campus-wide media center, new football locker rooms and team spaces, media rooms, additional restrooms and concession stands, donor plazas at the J and K gates, and renovated gates to enhance safety and security. This project was made possible through the generous support of many athletic donors.

For more information on how you can help MSU invest in champions, visit msuspartans.com.

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DAWN OF THE SPARTANS

Dawn of the Spartans

Would the "Michigan Staters" intimidate in the same way that "Spartans" strike fear into our opponents? Thankfully, the world will never know. In 1925, a naming competition was held to create a new identity for the renamed Michigan State College of Agriculture and Applied Science and the "Michigan Staters" was selected as the winner. However, sportswriter George Alderton disagreed with the choice and chose to use "Spartans," submitted by Perry J. Fremont, in his stories. Soon, even The State News began using the reference in their paper. Eighty-eight years later, Spartans past and present are still thankful that we have one of the most powerful and respected appellations in college sports.

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ATOMIC SPARTAN EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS

ATOMIC SPARTAN EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS

Hailing from humble farming origins, Lyman Briggs entered Michigan Agricultural College at the age of 15. Without any secondary education prior to testing into the university, few would believe that Briggs would become one of the nation's leading multi-disciplinary scientists. Briggs went on to graduate with a degree in agriculture, but soon discovered a passion for physics.

These core interests lead Briggs to the forefront of innovation in many scientific fields. While leading the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Physics Laboratory, Briggs founded the science of soil physics, a discipline based on his extensive background in ecology, biology and physics.

Eventually, Briggs' expertise in physics placed him on the government's radar. In October 1939, shortly after the discovery of uranium fission, he was called upon to lead a covert operation called the Uranium Committee. President Franklin Roosevelt entrusted Briggs with discovering the potential for atomic power. Despite personal adversity and a lack of funding, Briggs' research went on to become the foundation of the Manhattan Project. In recognition of his contributions to the war effort, Briggs was awarded the Medal of Merit by President Truman in 1945.

Having lived a life full of discovery and never ending quest for answers, it is no surprise that Michigan State University named a college in his honor, a fitting tribute for a man who accomplished so much. To learn more about the college that bears his name, visit lymanbriggs.msu.edu.

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NO KERNEL LEFT BEHIND: INDUSTRY STAYS CORNY

NO KERNEL LEFT BEHIND

Michigan State University has always been proud of its agricultural roots. Today, the university maintains one of the nation's best agricultural programs and was once the top-ranked school internationally. Given the success of the program, it should come as no surprise that one of its graduates went on to revolutionize the popcorn industry. Alumnus Steven Dexter discovered a method of maintaining optimal moisture within corn, creating better tasting popcorn and less kernel waste.

Dexter's breakthrough occurred during World War II, which turned out to be an opportune time. Prior to the war, candy was the food of choice at the theater. With sugar rations affecting the candy industry, popcorn became the snack food king and consumption increased tenfold.

Even today, Michigan State's love affair with popcorn continues. In 2011, ConAgra Foods, producer of Orville Redenbacher popcorn, funded and supplied the materials for a course based on the science of popcorn. Lyman Briggs students were given the opportunity to research explosiveness, kernel size distribution and hull thickness, all in the pursuit of a supreme popcorn kernel. At the course's conclusion, students traveled to Omaha, Nebraska to present their findings to ConAgra's popcorn experts. The catalyst behind this course's conception was ConAgra Executive Vice President of Research, Quality and Innovation Albert Bolles, who also happens to be a distinguished graduate from Lyman Briggs College. To learn more about this project, visit homecoming.msu.edu/conagra.

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MITTS BECOMES THROWER FOR DA BEARS

MITTS BECOMES THROWER FOR DA BEARS

Willie Thrower was born on March 22, 1930, in New Kensington, Pennsylvania. Thrower played quarterback for New Valley High, where he was named an All-American and led his team to multiple titles. He subsequently earned the nickname "Mitts" for his large hands and immense arm strength. These achievements are even more spectacular considering Thrower was African-American and was forced to thrive in an openly racist society. In recognition of New Valley High's domination they were invited to the Peanut Bowl, a tournament based in Miami, Florida, that featured the top high school teams. Unfortunately, tournament organizers rescinded their offer to New Valley once they learned of Thrower's ethnicity.

After high school, Thrower played for Michigan State where he was part of the 1952 National Championship team. Under Coach Clarence "Biggie" Munn, Thrower became the first black quarterback to play in the Big Ten, although his playing time was limited. Following college, he signed a one-year contract with the Chicago Bears and played one game for the team, becoming the first black quarterback to play in the NFL. Thrower's legacy went unrecognized for nearly a quarter of a century before he was inducted into the AK Valley Hall of Fame. Despite his short professional career, Thrower influenced many people, even being referenced in Warren Moon's Pro Football Hall of Fame acceptance speech.

Fourteen years after the MSU football team played the first African American quarterback in the Big Ten, Coach Duffy Daugherty started its first black quarterback, Jimmy Raye, who helped win the 1966 National Championship. At a time when promising black athletes were largely relegated to traditionally black colleges, Coach Daugherty played a significant role in helping to integrate collegiate football. The story of MSU's role in changing the face of college football is told in the upcoming book Raye of Light: Jimmy Raye, Duffy Daugherty, the Integration of College Football and the 1965-66 Michigan State Spartans, which is being released on September 4, 2014.

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SERENDIPITOUS DISCOVERY SAVES LIVES

SERENDIPITOUS DISCOVERY SAVES LIVES

Sometimes the greatest discoveries are made as a matter of chance. Were it not for the apple that fell on Isaac Newton's head, for example, the concept of gravity may never have been discovered. And if it were not for a stack of dirty dishes, Alexander Fleming may have never unearthed penicillin. Barnett Rosenberg's discovery of Cisplatin follows suit.

Rosenberg graduated from Brooklyn College in 1948 and earned a PhD in physics from NYU in 1956. His first major breakthrough came in 1965 while on MSU's faculty. While performing experiments to determine whether electromagnetic energy could stop cell growth in bacteria, Rosenberg and his colleagues discovered that platinum-containing electrodes, not electromagnetic energy, ceased cell division. Additional research established that electrode platinum, when combined with chloride and ammonium, had an even more dramatic effect on cells.

Recognizing the implications for tumor growth, Rosenberg began producing the chemotherapy drug Cisplatin in 1978 and it is still widely used today. Cisplatin has a cure rate of nearly 100 percent for testicular cancers and significantly lowers the rates of lung cancers, head and neck cancers, bone cancers and early-stage ovarian cancers. In 1999, three separate studies appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine which found that Cisplatin, when combined with radiation treatment, reduced death rates from cervical cancer by up to 50 percent. The results were so definitive that the National Cancer Institute, for only the fifth time in history, didn't wait until the findings were published and immediately sent notices to thousands of oncologists around the world urging them to implement the treatment.

The MSU Foundation, which received royalties from the Cisplatin discovery, helped fund the Barnett Rosenberg Chair in Neuroscience. In 2001, S. Marc Breedlove, one of the world's foremost authorities on the development of the central nervous system, was appointed to the position. .

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PHYSICISTS COLLIDE, Spartans FLY

PHYSICISTS COLLIDE, Spartans  FLY

Nuclear physics research began on campus in 1958. In the following years, MSU gained worldwide notoriety for its innovations in the field of nuclear science and cross-disciplinary research. Major contributions were made in the studies of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, heavy-ion reaction mechanisms, accelerator physics and beam dynamics, terms that wouldn't seem out of place in an episode of Star Trek.

MSU's first nuclear physics lab was opened in 1965, and our current National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory is among the world's finest. MSU remains on the leading edge of this research, having been chosen as the site for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). With funding from Michigan State University, the Department of Energy Office of Science and the State of Michigan, FRIB will embark upon groundbreaking research into the properties of rare isotopes for the purposes of understanding the physics of nuclei, nuclear astrophysics and societal applications.

Construction began in March 2014 and is expected to be completed in June 2022 at a total cost of $730 million. FRIB will draw some of the foremost scientific experts to MSU and will likely result in an age of discovery and innovation that may very well be responsible for some of this century's greatest findings.

For more information on the FRIB project, visit frib.msu.edu.

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MSU TAKES IT TO THE STREETS

MSU TAKES IT TO THE STREETS

Improving the lives of individuals and communities is at the very heart of the MSU ethic and the university has a long and storied history of finding innovative ways to make a difference. The creation in 1967 of what is now called the Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement is one such effort.

In response to a request from Michigan Governor George Romney in 1960, MSU students first began volunteering for short-term opportunities in 1962. Five years later, the MSU Board of Trustees approved the creation of an office to help facilitate connecting students with service opportunities. In the years since it was formally created, the office has been responsible for initiatives including Alternative Spring Break, the national "Into the Streets" Day of Service and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service, among many others. The intent of this effort is to link areas of study, develop leaders, encourage ongoing care of others, promote social justice and civic responsibility and increase student engagement.

The number of students involved has increased steadily over time, with nearly 21,000 accommodations made during the 2012-2013 academic year. To learn more about the Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement, or to register for a service opportunity, visit servicelearning.msu.edu.

For the last two years, the Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement and the MSU Alumni Association have partnered together to show the world the extraordinary impact that Spartans can make on a single day. The SPARTANS WILL. POWER Global Day of Service brings together MSU students and alumni throughout the world to visibly demonstrate the Spartan work ethic. The 2014 event in April involved 1,243 Spartans in 98 locations who donated nearly 5,000 hours of service. The next SPARTANS WILL. POWER Global Day of Service will be held on April 18, 2015. For more information on the project, visit serviceday.msu.edu.

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MAGIC'S SHOW, BIRD PULLED OUT OF HAT

MAGIC'S SHOW, BIRD PULLED OUT OF HAT

Basketball had played second fiddle to football far too long at MSU and in 1979 an air of sorcery encompassed the campus. Students were left believing their team could go all the way in the NCAA Tournament. The Spartans' leading scorer, Earvin "Magic" Johnson, bamboozled team after team throughout the regular season then went on to lead the Spartans in a dominating march to the NCAA Tournament final. And what a final act it would be from Magic Johnson. In a game against the undefeated Indiana State Sycamores, Johnson scored 24 points and cemented his rivalry with Larry Bird. The Spartans defeated the Sycamores 75-64 during what is still the highest-rated game in NCAA Tournament history.

Magic Johnson continues to maintain ties with the MSU basketball program, which has enjoyed an unparalleled period of success under Head Coach Tom Izzo, now the longest serving active men's basketball coach in the Big Ten. Under Izzo's leadership, MSU has won a NCAA Championship, seven Big Ten Championships and four Big Ten Tournament Championships. The Spartans have also made six Final Four appearances as part of 17 straight appearances in the tournament. With a strong commitment to academics, Izzo graduates 83 percent of all players that complete eligibility and has coached two Academic All-Americans.

For more information on the men's basketball team, visit msuspartans.com.

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EAST SIDE STORY, BROADWAY TAKES LANSING

EAST SIDE STORY, BROADWAY TAKES LANSING

World-class facilities, world-class education, world-class athletics. With an already spectacular campus, Michigan State University added a world-class performance venue in 1982. Since the inaugural performance by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Wharton Center for Performing Arts has become a dynamic and evolving cultural resource. From Broadway blockbusters like Phantom of the Opera, Disney's THE LION KING and WICKED, to world-renowned orchestras, dance companies, jazz ensembles and more, Wharton Center hosts an impressive line-up of more than 100 performances each season and attracts patrons from throughout the region.

Today, Wharton Center is about much more than the performances that grace its stages. Countless center programs integrate the arts and academics and create opportunities for engagement throughout the community, such as the Seats 4 Kids program which provides tickets to economically disadvantaged children. The MSU Federal Credit Union Institute for Art and Creativity at Wharton Center provides meaningful, participatory lifelong learning programs both at Wharton Center and throughout the state for audiences of all ages. All of these programs demonstrate Wharton Center's commitment to living its mission of enriching lives and strengthening the value of the arts in everyday life.

The center was the realization of MSU President Clifton R. Wharton's dream and was named in honor of him and his wife Dolores. Their unsurpassed support for the project and love for the arts continue to be reflected in the caliber of performers brought to the center today.

For more information about Wharton Center for Performing Arts, visit whartoncenter.com.

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IT'S A SPARTY ON TOP

IT'S A SPARTY AT THE TOP

In the spring of 1989 a university committee came together to design and revamp the Sparty mascot. Intensive research of Michigan State's mission, community and traditions were conducted and resulted in an "approachable, fierce yet kind, a man for all seasons" mascot. Sparty would reflect the image of strength and character, not only on the athletic field, but the academic arena as well. During this time the Association of Future Alumni (formerly the Student Alumni Foundation) accepted the responsibility of overseeing the program and Sparty was officially introduced on September 16, 1989. A year later, our beloved mascot was ranked the number one mascot in the nation. Since that time, Sparty has also been named "Buffest Mascot" by Muscle and Fitness Magazine and has been named the national champion mascot twice.

Sparty is currently competing with 15 other collegiate mascots in the Capital One Mascot Challenge, being pitted against another mascot each week in a fan voting competition. To vote for Sparty and help him advance to the finals, visit capitalonebowl.com.

You can find Sparty at nearly any event taking place on campus and several places beyond East Lansing. Making more than 300 appearances annually, Sparty is a guest at weddings, parties, bar mitzvahs, parades, alumni functions, charity events, public showings, commercials and all major sporting events. He also makes appearances at elementary schools throughout the state as part of Sparty's Literacy Tour.

To learn more about Sparty, or request him for your next event, visit futurealumni.msu.edu.

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TEAM MSU USHERS IN NEW HEAD COACH

TEAM MSU USHERS IN NEW HEAD COACH

MSU alumna Dr. Lou Anna K. Simon began her career at Michigan State after earning her doctorate in 1974. From there, she moved into a variety of administrative roles until being appointed president in January 2005. She is the first female president of MSU and is currently one of only nine women to hold the position of president among the membership of the Association of American Universities.

As president, Simon has engaged Michigan State in a strategic and transformative journey to adapt the principles of the land-grant tradition to 21st-century challenges. She has expanded MSU's reach in the state, and around the world, by focusing the university's strengths on solutions that enhance and protect quality of life: clean and affordable energy, access to education, safe and plentiful food and health care.

Simon is a member of the American Council on Education and the Council on Competitiveness, a nonpartisan, nongovernmental organization working to ensure U.S. prosperity. She serves as chair of the National Security Higher Education Advisory Board, a group of presidents and chancellors of several prominent U.S. universities that consults regularly with national agencies responsible for security, intelligence and law enforcement. She also serves as chair of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's executive committee, the association's overarching governing panel.

Simon's resolute commitment to advancing Michigan's economic future has been a hallmark of her presidency. She serves on the board of directors of Business Leaders for Michigan and the Detroit Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and is an advisory committee member of the Detroit Innovation District, which promotes small business growth and job creation in the city. In the area of international engagement, Simon is a member of the executive committee of the Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa.

Learn more about President Simon at president.msu.edu.

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A NEW ANGLE ON ART

A NEW ANGLE ON ART

Opened in 2012, the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum is a contemporary museum devoted to the exploration and exhibition of significant art from around the globe. The museum's international outlook helps MSU extend its global and cultural networks and provides a practical benefit both to the regional artistic community and to students.

In its first year, the Broad Art Museum welcomed 115,000 guests from 80 countries. The local economic impact of the museum is expected to continue to grow, with a 2012 Anderson Economic Group estimate of $5.75 million projected. In 2014, the museum was named one of 10 museums internationally worth visiting by arcspace.com and is only one of two museums in the United States to make the list.

After a design competition, Pritzker Prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid was selected for the project. A work of art itself, the museum features a striking facade of pleated stainless steel and glass, signaling the dynamic vision of the museum and university.

The museum is named for Eli and Edythe Broad, longtime supporters of Michigan State University. In 1991, the Broads endowed The Eli Broad College of Business and The Eli Broad Graduate School of Management at Michigan State University. They have also supported a partnership between the MSU College of Education and Detroit Schools. Recognizing the power of art to inspire and uplift, the Broads gave $28 million to create the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at MSU.

For more information on the Broad Art Museum, visit broadmuseum.msu.edu.

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IT'S ELEMENTARY, MY DEAR WATSON

IT'S ELEMENTARY, MY DEAR WATSON

Michigan State University not only provides an outstanding education to its students, it also helps the next generation of instructors develop through its highly acclaimed College of Education. In 2014, graduate study in the areas of both elementary and secondary education was ranked No. 1 in the nation for the 20th consecutive year, according to the U.S. News & World Report ranking of education graduate programs. The College of Education ranks 15th overall in the magazine's 2015 edition of "America's Best Graduate Schools" and 8th among public universities.

A total of eight graduate study areas at MSU are in the top 10: elementary education (#1), secondary education (#1), rehabilitation counseling (#2), curriculum and instruction (#4), higher education administration (#5), educational psychology (#6), administration/supervision (#7) and education policy (#10).

The doctoral program in kinesiology at Michigan State University is also highly ranked at 6th in the nation, according to a report from the National Academy of Kinesiology. The program review accounts for measures of faculty contributions and student performance during the years 2005-2009.

In addition to a sound academic foundation, MSU College of Education graduates are also likely to leave campus with a job. Ninety-two percent of MSU teaching interns were employed during the 2012-13 school year and an additional 4 percent were continuing their education.

For more information about the College of Education, visit education.msu.edu.

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